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3D Printed Stand for Kaiweets Multimeters

Originally published on Cults.

Kaiweets smart multimeters are a great aid for makers: they’ve a big colored display more readable and clear than a lot of multimeters on the market and have a lot of functions we’ve always wanted on this kind of instruments!

One of my preferred features is an indication on where to attach probes while selecting functions: how many times we’ve burned an instrument because we wanted to measure the current while leaving the test leads in the voltage position? With Kaiweets Smart Multimeters this problem is solved for ever! Some colored leds and an indication on display say you where to connect test leads and they say also if you’ve connected wrong! Great!

These and other cool functions made Kaiweets my choice for helping me during my creative process.

I only missed one thing on those instruments: the possibility to make them stand-up in an angled vertical position during my work. This is not a problem for most since the provided bumper is great: it allows to lay multimeter on a surface (or keeping it with an hand) without scratch it. But for my work I needed to keep the multimeter in vertical facing me while working on my bench, so I’ve designed some supports for the Kaiweets Multimeters models KM601 and ST600Y to be 3D printed.

Those supports are made of 2 parts:

• Part 1 or "Top" is the socket in which the multimeter is placed. KM601 has a rounded profile so the socket. The socket is opened on the bottom since this multimeter has test leads sockets on the lower part. ST600Y has a squared profile and probes are attached frontally, so the socket is closed at the bottom.

• Part 2 or "Foot" is the lower part. The two legs have frontally an angle of 25° respect to the floor, so the multimeter will face you slightly tilted allowing it to be stable without oscillations. Foot dimensions for both multimeters are different since the ST600Y is smaller than the KM601, so cannot be swapped.

The two parts meant to be attached each other using the same method used also in some kinds of brick toys: stud and hole. Foot has 6 studs and Top part has 6 holes.

You can download both designs on Cults3D by following this link: https://tinyurl.com/testerstand

I asked a small fee since I’ve spent a lot of time in designing and printed a lot of parts until I obtained a good and functional object.

"Top" part needs to be printed with supports enabled since has overhangs. "Foot" usually doesn't need supports: the only overhang parts are the studs but they develop smoothly during the print, so supports are not needed.

If your printer is well calibrated, two parts can be attached firmly but I advice to put some glue on the foot surface where the studs are placed.

I advice to use a strong material such as the PETG, but a good PLA+ with a strong infill (50%) is very good too.

What to Look for in a Self Leveling Laser Level

Before we look at our individual choices, let’s talk about self-leveling lasers, and what you should expect. There are a number of factors to consider, and manufacturers offer all kinds of bells and whistles. In that sense, every laser level is unique. But there are also some features you should be looking at in every laser level. You need to consider the accuracy, the type of laser light, the laser’s range, and the quality of the build. Let’s take a look at each of these.

Accuracy

Before we look at our individual choices, let’s talk about self-leveling lasers, and what you should expect. There are a number of factors to consider, and manufacturers offer all kinds of bells and whistles. In that sense, every laser level is unique. But there are also some features you should be looking at in every laser level. You need to consider the accuracy, the type of laser light, the laser’s range, and the quality of the build. Let’s take a look at each of these.

Laser Color and Brightness

Most laser levels are made with either red or green lasers. This is because those wavelengths are the ones that are most visible to the human eye. But even the most easily visible laser can be hard to see in the outdoors. This is because the sun is 10 times as bright as ordinary interior light. You don’t notice it when you step outside, because your eyes adjust in a few seconds. But the sheer intensity of the sunlight will block out all but the brightest laser levels. And even levels that work outdoors will have much shorter range than they will indoors. For this reason, some levels come with white or reflective panels to project the laser onto.

Laser Range

Next, you need to think about the range of the laser light. This will be a combination of brightness and accuracy. At the point where the beam is no longer visible, or wildly inaccurate, it can no longer be used. Professional-grade outdoor levels will be effective to at least 100 feet, and sometimes as far as 300 feet. Indoor levels will typically have a much shorter range, since a longer range is usually pointless.

Quality of Engineering

Finally, look at the overall quality of the build. Is the level water-resistant? Is it designed for tripod mounting? What are your other mounting options? Is there a carrying case? Can the level withstand a drop? These types of considerations are particularly important when you’re using your level outdoors. However, even an indoor level is subject to abuse, and will benefit from good mounting options.